Offbeat Video

By Katy Gill


For these dedicated domino artists, smashing down their creations is part of the CIRCLE OF LIFE, as their recent 90,000-tile structure retold the story of the Lion King.

Taking 30 hours to piece together – yet less than four minutes to fall down – the tumbling dominoes showcase some of the movie’s most famous scenes – from Simba being held to the sky by Rafiki, to Scar pushing Mufasa off the cliff side.

PICS BY JOHANNES LINNEBRINK / CATERS NEWS

Dedicated Johannes Linnenbrink, from Rheda-Wiendruck, Germany, spent three months display, which he pieced together alongside a team of five other builders. 

It is the seventh year in a row the software designer has used his old school gym to set up an impressive domino display – but this year’s attempt was far greater, beating Johannes’ personal best by 23,765 tiles. 

PICS BY JOHANNES LINNEBRINK / CATERS NEWS

In the footage, filmed on June 3, town mayor Theo Mettenborg sends the first stone toppling before the therapeutic sight of the mutlicoloured display comes to life, painting out famous scenes from the 1994 Disney classic.

Johannes said: “The designing started in December, with a three-month-long brainstorming session, after settling on the topic of Lion King, I came up with 27 different projects of scenes within this piece.

PICS BY JOHANNES LINNEBRINK / CATERS NEWS

“I worked with Marco Vorbusch, the other organiser, on the master plan. 

“We decided the positions of the individual scenes and where to set up the lines to connect them together, so that everything topples in the right sequence – that took a month alone.

“The music from Lion King was huge influence in deciding on this being our chosen subject for this year’s piece.

“Besides of the sound of dominoes, we all like to listen to the music.”

When preparing the displays, builders used steady hands, ensuring onto two of the scenes toppled in the building process and were quickly re-stacked. 

PICS BY JOHANNES LINNEBRINK / CATERS NEW

The designer-cum-domino artist used an online software to calculate how many dominos were needed for each scene to ensure he ordered enough bricks.

Johannas and Marco set up a group, Wiedenbrücker Domino Toppling (WDT), in 2012, and each passing year they beat their previous year’s record for the number of tiles used, lining up attempts with Domino Day.

PICS BY JOHANNES LINNEBRINK / CATERS NEWS

When they began, their first structure used one seventh of the number used for the Lion King sculpture.