Offbeat
By James Leese
photographer shares snaps of an abandoned mansion that once belonged to W.K Kellogg – founder of the Kellogg cereal company.
David Bulit, 32, from Alabama, US, visited the abandoned mansion that features soundproof rooms, secret passageways, stained glass windows, mosaic tilework, Moorish arches, and curved Spanish-inspired staircases
After becoming aware of the mansion last year, David never expected that he would get to see it in the flesh until a friend who had visited the house put him in contact with the owner and those overseeing the salvaging of the fixtures.

David, who has been exploring abandoned locations for over 12 years, says that his favourite part about the Kellogg Mansion is the artwork.
He added: “They were painted by Don Ringelspaugh – a local artist who also did the tile work on the house.
“Although some of it is quite tacky such as the Egyptian paintings with the plastic gemstones alongside them, some of the artwork is appealing like the fountain mosaic in the driveway or the peacock in the sitting room.
“The house was purchased by W.K. Kellogg in 1934 as one of his winter homes.
“Despite its name, it was built in 1925 as the personal home of Edward Frischkorn.
“Frischkorn was a Detroit businessman and home builder who developed Dunedin Isles in the town of Dunedin, Florida, between 1925 and 1929.
“I’ve explored many abandoned homes over the past 12 years, and I can say that homes are some of the most interesting places to photograph.
“There is such a personal connection when exploring homes as opposed to businesses or schools or industrial facilities.
“People lived here, had their whole lives here. Some have their whole family history attached to these homes and even part of the city or town’s history.”

David says that while walking around the property, it was rather heartbreaking to know that it would eventually be demolished but being there in person it is understandable somewhat.
He added: “There’s extensive water damage which can be seen in the ceilings.
“With that, the house has a big mould problem, especially in the carriage house. I’ve been told there’s also asbestos.
“So, to be renovated, the house at the very least would need a new roof, new walls, probably new floors, and who knows what other problems would be found.
“There’s not much left from the Kelloggs other than the house itself. The house was extensively renovated in the past with rooms being added or extended, entryways and windows either removed or changed drastically.
“There is also a balcony or tower at the top of the mansion with no way to get up there which makes me think there is a secret passageway up there, though that hasn’t been found as of yet.”