Animals

By Alex Matthews 


This poor beaver piled on a few too many pounds over winter – and managed to get himself stuck as a result.

The adult noble beaver, an official symbol of Canada for over 300 years, was found trapped between iron railings on Wednesday.

Pic from Hamilton Animal Service /Caters News 

He could normally be expected to slip through the gap, but a winter of inactivity means beavers are currently carrying extra fat.

This beaver clearly forgot he was not as trim as he used to be, and got his rear-end wedged in.

He couldn’t pull himself free with his tiny front paws.

City of Hamilton Animal Services were called at midday on Wednesday to rescue the poor creature.

Officer Sarah Mombourquette had to use soap to squeeze the animal out of its tight spot.

Pic from Hamilton Animal Service /Caters News

An animals services spokesperson said: “Animal Services was called to an address to find a full-size adult beaver, carrying excess fat from a long winter hibernation, wedged between two bars.‎

“The noble beaver (Castor canadensis), an official symbol of Canada for over 300 years, is known for its large buck teeth to cut through wood. Unfortunately for this beaver, his sharp incisors were not helpful in cutting through the iron fence.

“He landed, as the Canadian-ism goes, arse over teakettle through the fence onto a lower section of ground and couldn’t pull his rear-end through with his tiny front paws.”

After he was rescued, the beaver rested at the Hamilton Animal Services shelter and enjoyed a healthy, veggie diet.

He was then transferred to Hobbitstee Wildlife Refuge in Jarvis, Ontario.

Pic from Hamilton Animal Service /Caters News 

The spokesperson said: “While at the shelter, the beaver showed gratitude for his rescue by constructing a wooden doghouse for the resident mutts and a new sturdy scratching post for the cats.

“The beaver sustained injuries from the fence and will be fully rehabilitated before being released back into the wild, along with a stern lecture about staying close to his aquatic home.”

He is expected to take a week to heal.