Offbeat Video

By Josh Saunders


An urban explorer is revealing the abandoned power station used in the film Blade Runner 2049 that he dubs a ‘death trap’.

Bob Thissen, 33, visited the spot an hour outside of Budapest in Hungary, showing its eerie emptiness, moss, rust clad walls and more.

PICS BY BOB THISSEN / CATERS NEWS

Describing the vast site as an ‘enormous industrial maze’, part of it was used as a location for the sequel to Ridley Scott’s 1984 dystopian sci-fi flick Blade Runner.

The new instalment, sees Ryan Gosling hunt down Harrison Ford and other robots known as ‘replicants’, fearing an uprising against mankind after it’s discovered they can reproduce.

Shots show Gosling inside an abandoned ‘shipyard’ and walking down stairs within the rusting location, according to Bob, from Heerlen, the Netherlands.

Bearing clear no entry signs, the urban explorer – known as an urbexer – carefully treads around dangerous cooling towers, gloomy warehouses amassed in pipes and into the control room.

PICS BY BOB THISSEN / CATERS NEWS

The plant which remains an industrial grey with odd smatterings of colour, looks empty, aging and is currently in the process of being demolished.

Bob said: “These buildings always feel like an enormous industrial maze. You can walk for hours in there.

“They often have a sci-fi look, so I am not surprised it was used in Bladerunner 2049

“The cooling towers were very dangerous! It was a death trap to walk there.

“You have to watch out with rusty metal which you can fall through.

PICS BY BOB THISSEN / CATERS NEWS

“The boiler room is very recognizable, although they changed it a little in postproduction.

“There are some shots made in the boiler part, he walks down the stairs of a very sci-fi looking building.

“The power station is abandoned for quite a while and is being demolished at the moment. The control room was still in use.

“The turbines are already dismantled, and I wonder what will happen to the building.

“I liked the decay and the symmetry of the boiler room.

PICS BY BOB THISSEN / CATERS NEWS

“I also liked the decayed turbine room, even flowers were growing next to them.

“Nowadays most power stations don’t get the chance to decay anymore, because they get demolished quickly after being decommissioned.”

For more information, visit: www.bobthissen.com