Animals Video

By Mike Jones


THIS lively baby gorilla was caught on camera trying to play hide and seek with a tourist in the Ugandan forest. 

The tiny primate attempts to grab hold of the woman’s coat as he mimics childs play. 

He was filmed during a hike to see the endangered species in the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest in Uganda. 

PIC BY BOBBY-JO VIAL / CATERS NEWS

The country is home to home to 50 per cent of all wild mountain gorillas. 

Co-founder of the safaris Bobby-Jo Vial, 35, said: “The video was taken whilst tracking endangered mountain gorillas. 

“The lady in the video was on a photographic safari with Duma Safaris. 

“After a technical climb through thick vegetation we finally reached the Bweza gorilla family. This family is quite unique because they have three Silverbacks, most gorilla families only have one.

“Our safari group were photographing a gorgeous little gorilla juvenile – thought to be two or three years old. The little gorilla decided to come quite close to our group. 

PIC BY BOBBY-JO VIAL / CATERS NEWS

“Gorilla guidelines state that you need to keep a distance of seven metres but sometimes this is not always possible when you are surrounded by thick vegetation and are on the side of a mountain. 

“The juvenile gorilla kept approaching us and then decided that he wanted one of our guests’ purple jacket. 

“He was extremely playful and kept hiding under her jacket that was tied around her waist. 

“Our ranger told our guest to remain calm. Whilst this kind of behaviour is not encouraged or instigated with wild gorillas it was amazing to watch. The gorilla juvenile was just like a human child playing. 

“The juvenile gorilla was extremely playful right throughout our 60 minutes spent with the Bweza Family. At one stage he did a somersault down the side of the mountain and crashed into the back of my legs. 

PIC BY BOBBY-JO VIAL / CATERS NEWS

“Meanwhile his mother and two silverbacks were very close by but did not seem concerned about his hilarious antics. 

“Gorilla tourism is very important for the future of the Mountain Gorillas. The permit provides protection, veterinary care and job opportunities for local people living at the edge of the forest. 

“Mountain Gorilla numbers have increased from 600 to 800 in just over 10 years. Uganda is home to 50 per cent of all wild mountain gorillas and I highly encourage wildlife lovers to visit this amazing country and support wildlife conservation through tourism.”