Amazing

By Jack Williams


These stunning images are enough to make viewers double take, as although they look like vibrant works of abstract art, they are actually certain parts of planet Earth from above.

PIC BY ABSTRACT AERIAL / CATERS: Be Individual

The aerial abstract works use both man-made and natural formations as their subject matter, photographing them in such a way that they would not look out place in a modern art museum.

Included in the Abstract Aerial Art series are the likes of marshlands, glaciers, a blood red river, sand spits in the ocean, salt lakes, disused mines, reefs, sea defenses, the inside of an abandoned cooling tower, and an abandoned international airport terminal.

PIC BY ABSTRACT AERIAL / CATERS: Broken Lands

The works are photographed by two brothers, JP and Mike Andrews, from near Wolverhampton in the UK, and since starting the series in December 2016, the pair have visited eight countries in total.

On their travels, JP and Mike have flown drones over the likes of Australia, France, Belgium, Switzerland, Spain, Iceland and the UK.

When shooting a location, the brothers wait for the best possible light conditions before flying their drone overhead – though, they admit, this can sometimes be easier said than done, given the time restraints.

To create the flat look of their images, all photographs in the Abstract Aerial Art series are captured with a camera that is pointing directly down, so to bring out the likes of lines and patterns.

PIC BY ABSTRACT AERIAL / CATERS: Pivot

JP, 32, said: “Our primary aim is to show how weird and wonderful the world can look from above.

“For us, the appeal with the type of photography we shoot has got to be capturing the most bizarre and thought provoking images possible.

“The ability to show others how incredible the world we all live in, and how different it can look from a perspective not many have the opportunity to witness is something that inspires us on a daily basis.”

The response to the year-old series has been extremely positive so far, the brothers said.

PIC BY ABSTRACT AERIAL / CATERS: Polka

In order to keep viewers guessing as to where and what their images depict, the Aerial Abstract Art social media accounts do not name the location or kind of landscape featured – instead, the works are simply called names such as “Pivot,” “Zig Zag,” and “Hallucinogen.”

Each image also comes with the duo’s motto: “The point is not to work out what it is, but to show how weird and wonderful the world can look from above.”

In order to discover interesting locations to photograph, the brothers use the likes of satellite imaging software, as, although not fool-proof, it does give them a sense of what they may be able to capture in a certain spot.

PIC BY ABSTRACT AERIAL / CATERS: Road Trippin

Going forward, the Andrews brothers hope to continue expanding their portfolio- possibly into Antarctica or Chernobyl.

A strong drone image, they believe, should have “good composition, textures and interesting or usual shapes.”

Mike, 30, said: “It doesn’t have to be complicated – quite often the most simplistic photographs look the most impressive, in our opinion.”

PIC BY ABSTRACT AERIAL / CATERS: Hallucinogen